069 Whaling Revisited

17 . 09 . 2019

Contributors


Henry Páll Wulff
Expedition Guide, Naturalist
Chris Marquardt
Photographer, Author, Podcaster, Traveler, Educator

Henry Páll Wulff

Expedition Guide, Naturalist

Chris Marquardt

Photographer, Author, Podcaster, Traveler, Educator

Notes

People have been whaling for thousands of years. In 1946, several countries joined to form the International Whaling Commission (IWC). Originally an industry body, the IWC’s purpose is to prevent overhunting of whales. However, the work of marine conservational ngo’s lead to a moratorium on commercial whaling in 1982. Many species of whale have benefitted from the IWC’s moratorium. Despite the general moratorium, limited whaling is permitted to indigenous cultures. Today, people are much more aware of the role of whales in the marine ecosystem, and the role of the IWC has also changed radically. What started as an industrial body turned into a forum for the protection and conservation of marine life.

068 Disappearing Cultures

10 . 09 . 2019

Contributors


Henry Páll Wulff
Expedition Guide, Naturalist
Chris Marquardt
Photographer, Author, Podcaster, Traveler, Educator

Henry Páll Wulff

Expedition Guide, Naturalist

Chris Marquardt

Photographer, Author, Podcaster, Traveler, Educator

Notes

The history of Greenland is interwoven with change. Always dependent on weather and climate, Greenland seems not to offer much to its settlers. And yet, over the centuries, people have settled in the thin coastal strip of Greenland. Little is known about the settlement flows of the Inuit, which originated from North America. But scientists manage to put together the puzzle from many individual finds. Today we know about trade between Norse settlers and Inuit. We know that the Vikings at some point just disappeared from Greenland. And we know the colonization history of Greenland, which is closely linked to the colonial power of Denmark. But what impact does this have on the current Greenlandic Inuit culture and will it experience a similar fate as the earlier cultures and simply become extinct over time?

067 Greenland Is Melting

03 . 09 . 2019

Contributors


Henry Páll Wulff
Expedition Guide, Naturalist
Chris Marquardt
Photographer, Author, Podcaster, Traveler, Educator

Henry Páll Wulff

Expedition Guide, Naturalist

Chris Marquardt

Photographer, Author, Podcaster, Traveler, Educator

Notes

After tormenting Europe for weeks, this year's heatwave is melting Greenland’s ice sheet at an unprecedented rate. As air temperatures over the ice rise, over half of the surface of the Greenland ice sheet had softened to slush. The result of this brutal setup is a summer melt season so intense that it’s on track to tie or break the record for the most water loss ever recorded. End of July, scientists recorded temperatures above 0°C at Greenland’s summit at over 3.000m altitude. This is only the third time temperatures have been recorded above freezing, but the second time this summer. These unusually high temperatures are accelerating ice loss from Greenland's Ice Sheet, which covers 80% of the island. By end of July, the area of the Greenland ice sheet showing indications of melt hit a record 56.5 per cent. On August 1st, thanks to 22°C, 12 billions tons of ice melted in just 24 hours, some 217 billion tons melted in the month of July, accumulating to an estimated 248 billion tons that have been lost so far this year, just on track of 2012’s record loss of 250 billion tons. The problem of melting polar ice creates a nasty positive feedback loop that meddles with the planet’s ability to cool off. Since ice is reflective, it does a good job at bouncing solar radiation back into space. However, with less ice, more of this heat energy is soaked up by the Earth and becomes trapped in the atmosphere.

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